Chronic Pain: A Pseudo-Medical Trojan Rabbit

There is no argument that Oregon, and the US, has a problem with opiate addiction and chronic pain.

What to do about the problem is the question.

I have noticed that the pseudo-medical industrial complex has been aggressively positioning themselves as the solution to the problem.

In Oregon it is driven in part by the fact that we have the second highest rate of opiate abuse in the US.

As a result, Oregon produced the awful Health Evidence Review Board pain guidelines, which I discussed on SBM, which

open(s) the door to acupuncture, chiropractic, cognitive behavioral therapy, osteopathic manipulation and physical and occupational therapy.

Now the local pseudo-medicine school, the National University of Natural Medicine, is getting in on the act with Oregon Health Forum: Pain Management from Incidence to Intention Livestream.

The forum is co-sponsored by the Lund Report and the Quest Center for Integrative Health, the latter purveyors of osteopathic, naturopathic, and Chinese medicine.

And moderated by an ND and Lac.

I would bet that an evidence/science-based understanding of pain interventions are not going to be high on the list.

The press release says

NUNM Health Centers Executive Director, Michael Sorensen notes "Natural medicine therapies have been proven to help manage pain and can address the critical need to find ways to reduce opioid dependence.

And I wonder what natural medicine therapies he is referring to? Looking that the pseudo-medicines taught at NUNM I find

  • Acupuncture? No. As if sticking needles into people is natural.
  • Chiropractic and naturopathic manipulative therapy? No.
  • Herbs and Botanicals? No.
  • Hydrotherapy? No.
  • Homeopathy? No.
  • Exercise? Sure. But that's it.

All the good data suggests no efficacy for any the above for pain beyond placebo effect.

But given the nature of naturopathic education and training, immersed in all that is pseudo-science and pseudo-medicine, why would this roundtable be held under Naturopathic auspices? It would be like having a roundtable on problems in astrophysics sponsored by and held at an astrology school.

Because it is an in, a trojan rabbit that falsely legitimizes their practice. Pseudo-medical providers of all stripes repeat the same fiction: their interventions are effective for pain and are a solution to opiate addiction.

They will build a wall between patients and their pain and make the pain pay for it. 

Repeat a fiction often enough and people will believe it as fact.

PS

If anyone happens to get the content of the roundtable and can send it my way, I would be interested. But I am not going to buy a ticket that supports pseudo-medicine in any way.